Category Archives: Jobs

4 Things I Learned from my PR Internship at Make-A-Wish

By Abby Cousineau

“School can teach you a lot, but nothing beats real-world experience.”

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Source: Abby Cousineau

I’m sure you have heard this phrase more than a few times in your life. And while it sounds cliché, there is a ring of truth to it.

This past summer, I spent my days working for an awesome non-profit, Make-A-WishÒ Michigan. While I learned a ton about PR and communications at a non-profit, here are the top four things I got out of my internship:

  1. Being a good writer is crucial

I can honestly say I wrote something every single day at my internship. Whether it was an email, a press release, a feature story or social media copy, it felt like I was literally always writing. At most non-profits, Make-A-Wish included, there is a small communications department that is responsible for pretty much everything PR/marketing related, so being a strong writer is important. You learn a lot of these writing skills in school, but nothing truly prepares you for your boss telling you she needs social media copy, a feature story and a press release by the end of the work day. Being able to write well, write quickly and being capable of taking one topic and translating it into multiple stories fit for different mediums is essential.

  1. Having solid research skills is almost as crucial as being a strong writer

During the summer, there were many times where I had to write about something I had no clue about. Being able to gather information and apply it to your project is a very good skill to have. Your boss will expect you to be able to find out what you need to complete the task on your own, and they will want you to be able to take that information and put it into something organized & clear.

  1. Event planning is tedious

Make-A-WishÒ Michigan puts on multiple fundraising events every year and I got to be part of & observe one of their largest events: the Wish-A-Mile Bike Tour. This event lasts three days, participants ride over 300 miles and there are multiple “mini” events that take place over the course of the weekend. I won’t get into the whole thing, but I got to see first-hand how event planning works at a non-profit. SO much goes into this process & it is extremely tedious. Communication between team members and extensive preparation has to be more than solid to pull off large-scale fundraising events. The weeks leading up to the Wish-A-Mile tour were hectic, but seeing everything come together in the end was truly magical and made all the stress feel worth it.

  1. If you want to work in PR, you have to be passionate about the company you work for

I think this is especially true if you choose to work for a non-profit, but working in PR in general can be exhausting. At my internship I saw my supervisors put in 15 hour days, push themselves physically and mentally for three days during the Wish-A-Mile Tour, and spend countless hours planning events, writing stories and working on design projects. PR can be draining, but if you work for a company you truly believe in it makes everything easier. There were a few times where I questioned why I was going to school for PR, but when I saw a kid get their wish granted, or talked to a parent on the phone and heard them cry about how grateful they were for the wish experience, it made me realize how powerful and meaningful the jobs we do every day really are.

Abby Cousineau is a senior at EMU majoring in public relations and minoring in graphic design and marketing. She is currently serving as president of EMU PRSSA and is excited to be leading such a creative and dedicated group of individuals. You can usually find Abby outside anytime the weather is nice or otherwise spending her time behind a computer screen, working on one of her design projects. Connect with Abby on Instagram @abcattt.
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Straight from the Recruiters Part 2: Nailing your Interview

By: NinaMaria Badalamenti

In my previous blog I explained a little bit about my experience at Global Team Blue’s “The Dirt” and some insight I got from their recruiters on what they like to see in a resume. In this blog I will continue but giving you tips on what they said they like to see in an interview. So here are 3 tips on how to nail your interview.

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Source: bluesignal.com

 

  • Do your research.

 

This is a big one. Doing research on the company ahead of time is very important. Having knowledge on the company going in shows your dedication and passion for the position. The recruiters will be able to tell that you spent the time to research and want know about your prospective place of work. Just take a little bit of time to explore their website and study up on their work and achievements. This shows that you’re excited to represent the company.

 

  • Ask questions.

 

When preparing for an interview you usually brush up on clever answers to common interview questions that you expect they might ask you, but what you don’t think about is questions to ask them. By asking the interviewer questions you are showing them that you are interested in them and the position. The recruiters of GTB made a point to emphasize this step because it means a lot and they don’t see many people do it.

 

  • Follow up.

 

Following up after an interview is a very crucial step that many of us may skip. The best way to follow up is to send the interviewer a thank you email within the next 48 hours. Make sure you actually put some thought into this and not pre-write it. Make it personalized to show that you really care and appreciate the time they spent with you.

NinaMaria Badalamenti is a senior studying Communications. This is her first semester serving as VP of External Relations for EMU PRSSA.

Why You Need A LinkedIn Account

By Abby Cousineau

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Having an updated LinkedIn account can help you find a job before you graduate college

You have probably heard your professors tell you million times to create a LinkedIn account. If you haven’t listened to them yet, now is the time to hop on the bandwagon and do it.

Creating a LinkedIn account can help you in a million ways, but here are the main reasons you need to create an account before you graduate.

 

  • Job Recruiters and Hiring Managers are on LinkedIn

 

According to the polling company, Jobvite, nearly 94% of recruiters say they use LinkedIn to find candidates. This means if you want a better chance of getting a job, do yourself a favor and create an account, it could help you get discovered by your dream company.

 

  • Networking

 

Having a LinkedIn account connects you with employers, current job opportunities and can help employers find relevant candidates (AKA you!). Getting a LinkedIn also helps you keep up with your peers’ professional accomplishments. Having a strong LinkedIn network could help alert you to job openings and could get you a foot-in-the-door if you know someone at a company.

 

  • Online Resume

 

We all know that your physical resume should only be 1-2 pages long, especially if you are a recent grad. If you are having trouble fitting all your credentials in the page limit, a LinkedIn account can help you greatly. Your LinkedIn profile essentially acts like your resume, and there is no limit to how much information or how many areas you can include. Try to put your most relevant skills and experiences on your hard copy resume and feel free to go more in depth on your LinkedIn profile.

 

  • Research

 

Having a hard time finding companies that are actually hiring? You can use LinkedIn to search for jobs in your area. Don’t waste a million hours searching Google, instead head over to the jobs tab of LinkedIn, select your city and the positions you’re looking for and rejoice in all the job opportunities before you. Oh, and the best part? Most of the time you can apply to the job with your LinkedIn profile. It’s the easiest job application ever!

 

  • Endorsements and Recommendations

 

Say farewell to the old-school recommendation letters and say hello to LinkedIn endorsements and recommendations. LinkedIn allows people to endorse your skills as well as have colleagues and bosses give you recommendations (testimonials which explain how awesome you are). These all can help confirm your abilities to recruiters and hiring managers who don’t know you personally.

Abby Cousineau is a senior at EMU majoring in public relations and minoring in graphic design and marketing. She is currently serving as president of EMU PRSSA and is excited to be leading such a creative and dedicated group of individuals. You can usually find Abby outside anytime the weather is nice or otherwise spending her time behind a computer screen, working on one of her design projects. Connect with Abby on Instagram @abcattt.

3 tips for writing thank-you cards after a job interview

By: Anissa Gabbara

thank you card

Source: Pixabay.com

It’s post-graduation, and many of us already have several job interviews lined up. One of the most important things you can do besides NAIL the interview is to let the interviewer know that you appreciate his or her time and consideration by sending a thank-you card. Not only is sending a thank-you card a thoughtful gesture, but it makes you stand out from other candidates. Believe it or not, your competition may not be writing thank-you cards. Plus, it gives you another opportunity to express why you’d be the perfect fit for the position.

Here are three tips on writing a great thank-you card:

  1. Keep it short and sweet.

One or two paragraphs is all you need to make a great impression on the employer. Always thank the employer in the first line, and let him or her know you enjoyed the interview and still have interest in joining the team. Additionally, you should reiterate what makes you the perfect person for the job by emphasizing your strongest skills. Wrap up the card by thanking the employer once again, and leave the door open by letting the person know how you look forward to hearing from him or her.

  1. Personalize each card for each interviewer.

Panel interviews are quite common, and if you happen to have one, be sure to write a personalized card for each person who interviewed you. Once everyone on the panel receives your cards, it’s likely they will compare what you’ve written for each person and trust me, you don’t want each card to be identical. To personalize a thank-you card, point out something each person said during the interview that sparked your interest, or just a particular moment in the conversation you enjoyed. This shows you were genuinely engaged in the conversation and employers remember that.

  1. Send it out promptly.

Mail out your thank-you cards within 24 hours of the interview to ensure the employer receives it before making a final selection. With lots of competition out there, you can be easily forgotten, so it’s crucial that you send out your thank-you card ASAP to keep yourself at the forefront of the interviewer’s mind.

Anissa Gabbara is a senior at Eastern Michigan University studying public relations with a double minor in communications and marketing. She currently serves as the vice president of public relations on EMU PRSSA’s E-board. She has an interest in celebrity PR and hopes to one day work with some of the biggest names and corporations in the entertainment world. She plans to hone her craft while becoming a valuable source of information to others. You can follow her on Twitter @AnissaGabbara.  

 

 

 

Student Center looking for a part-time marketing communications coordinator

The Student Center is currently looking for a part-time student marketing communications coordinator. Check out the information below for more details:

The Student Center is looking for a talented, creative, enthusiastic individual with a strong character, excellent copywriting, effective presentation, good project management and execution skills. The individual must be enrolled full-time at EMU and have marketing experience, proficiency in social media platforms, Microsoft Office, and knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite. The Student Center offers an eclectic and energetic environment to work in and allows for free creative reign. This student position also offers competitive pay at a minimum of 20 hours per week. If you possess the above qualities please email your resume to vbiwa@emich.edu by November 30, 2016. For more information email or call Valerie Biwa at 487.8380

Job alert! Siren PR

According to the job description, Siren PR is “looking for a hard-working, confident public relations college senior or graduate to join our team as an assistant account executive.” This position involves writing, media relations, event support, social media, client service, and internal work. This is a paid, part-time position with a start date of April 11, 2016 and end date of July 22, 2016 (source).

For more information, including how to apply, visit the job description here. To learn more about Siren PR, visit here.

Job alert! Campus Life student assistant positions

Campus Life is now accepting applications for student assistant positions. According to the Campus Life page, “Campus Life is hiring student staff for 2016-2017! Working as a student assistant offers a challenging, pre-professional job experience to upper-class student leaders” (source). To apply, visit this page and click the link to the Google Form under “Additional Information.” Applicants will need their EMU PIN and E#.

The application deadline is Friday, Feb. 5 by 5 p.m.